A New Edition of Health Wonk Review—Does Barack Obama Remind You of Richard Nixon? . . . Will Most States Expand Medicaid? Do All Non-Profit Hospitals Deserve a Tax Exemption? Why Didn’t Anyone From J&J Go to Jail?

Brad Wright has hosted the most recent edition of Health Wonk Review http://www.healthpolicyanalysis.com/2013/11/07/if-you-like-the-health-wonk-review-you-currently-have-you-can-keep-it/, a round-up of some of the best recent healthcare posts in the blogosphere. It’s an excellent read.

Wright begins with a post by John Goodman, published at the NCPOA Health Policy Blog, and titled “The Selling of Obamacare.” There, Goodman acknowledges, “As for the president himself, he is a complete enigma to me. I’ve never felt that I understood him.’  Goodman goes on to prove his point by comparing Barack Obama to Richard Nixon.

According to Goodman, when “the President suggested that most people will be completely unaffected by the new health law . . . he was lying.” After all millions who buy their own insurance in the individual market place are now getting cancellation notices. The President “looked directly into the TV camera and said something that was blatantly untrue . . . over and over and over and over again. You have to go all the way back to Richard Nixon to find something comparable.”

That’s one way of looking at things,” Wright observes, “but it’s certainly not the only way. Over at the Colorado Health Insurance Insider,/ Louise Norris counters with these words:

“Much has been said recently about how the ACA is causing a tidal wave of policy cancellations, and resulting in people losing coverage that they would prefer to keep.  The frustrating part about this – as has generally been the case with every big uproar about the ACA – is that we’re not really getting a complete picture of what’s going on, and it’s hard to see the reality through all the hype and hysteria.

I agree.

Here is the larger picture: in fact, most Americans will not be affected by Obamacare. The vast majority are insured by their employers. Medicare, Medicaid or the military. Of the 311 million people who now live in the U.S., just 15 million purchase their own insurance. They represent 5% of the population. And only some of the 5% who buy their own coverage are getting those cancellation letters,

We are talking about less than 3% of the population –far from “most people.” 

The folks I worry about most are those who should qualify for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, but live in states that have refused to expand the program. (Often they are not eligible for Medicaid simply because they don’t have children, no matter how poor they are.)

Wright offers hope by spotlighting Joe Paduda’s post on Managed Care Matters. There, he asks: “What’s happening with Medicaid Coverage?”

 
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